Paramount cuts on demand delay to fight piracy

Finally. It appears that years of the public saying the same thing over and over again has at last penetrated the thick skulls of the people in the movie business, or at least in the Paramount owned part of it.

The Waiting Game

Anyone with half a brain knows that the biggest problem with films (leaving aside subjective things like quality) has been the delay between them leaving your local multiplex and being available to watch LEGALLY at home. Studios have traditionally waited around 3 months from the films cinema premier to the point it gets released to Sky Movies and other video on demand services, and then another delay before it gets released on disc. After the first month it’s probably not going to still be on the big screen, which leaves 2 months when people who missed it, but have heard the buzz about it and would be happy to pay to see it, can’t.

Money, Money

Paramount appear to have finally figured out this is costing them money, money in lost sales as some people turn to piracy,  and money from the vast publicity spent when the Film becomes available to home viewers.

When people cannot see a film legitimately, a number of them will turn to readily available, but illegal methods, as the music business showed quite some time ago, if you give people access to your product in a format and price that suits them, they will do so legally. Of course there will always be pirates, there were music pirates even before cassette tape was invented and the digital age just makes this easier, but on the whole, people are prepared to pay for what they get.

Soon?

Don’t expect Paramount or the other studios to change overnight, the plan is being trialed on a couple of lesser films this Autumn with them working their way up to the blockbusters later on, but at least it’s a start.

Source: Wall Street Journal via The Verge Image Source: Wikimedia


 

Darrell Jones

Geek Power's answer to Jeremy Clarkson. That's to say he's a sad, middle aged man with a big mouth who's trying to act like he's still in his twenties. he remembers the days of punch cards, paper tape and hard drives the size of toasters with the capacity of the kind of usb stick you might get in a Christmas cracker.

  • Stop filming the film pirate foo!!!!